Risk Engineering Body of Knowledge

Richard RobinsonALARP & SFAIRP, Due Diligence, Education, Risk Management, Uncategorized

Engineers Australia with the support of the Risk Engineering Society have embarked on a project to develop a Risk Engineering Book of Knowledge (REBoK). Register to join the community. The first REBoK session, delivered by Warren Black, considered the domain of risk and risk engineering in the context risk management generally. It described the commonly available processes and the way … Read More

SFAIRP not equivalent to ALARP

Richard RobinsonRisk Management

The idea that SFAIRP (so far as is reasonably practicable) is not equivalent to ALARP (as low as reasonably practicable) was discussed in Richard Robinson’s article in the January 2014 edition of Engineers Australia Magazine generates commentary to the effect that major organisations like Standards Australia, NOPSEMA and the UK Health & Safety Executive say that it is. The following review considers each briefly. This is an extract from the 2014 update of the R2A Text (Section 15.3).

R2A Event 2014

Richard RobinsonDue Diligence

Following on from the success of our client and colleagues function in 2013, we will be hosting another event on Thursday, 6th February 2014 from 3pm to 5pm.

Richard will launch the 2014 update of the R2A Text.  R2A has concluded that the risk and liability world is changing so fast at the moment that, until further notice, the text will be updated annually at least.

Matters of interest include:

  • The introduction of the Rail Safety National Law which is complimentary but subordinate to the model WHS legislation.
  • The expected approval in the new year of the Engineers Australia Safety Case Guideline (3 Edition). This specifically rejects the Risk Management Standard (AS 31000) as being able to positively demonstrate due diligence for high consequence – low frequency events.
  • Why SFAIRP (so far as is reasonably practicable) can never equal ALARP (as low as reasonably practicable) legally.
  • The logical limitations of Monte Carlo simulation for demonstrating project due diligence.